Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Name politics

Whilst there are good arguments for re-examine naming in academic citations, making specific allowances for certain scholars over others reminds us that academia continues to be elitist, thinks Payal Arora.

It was a typical academic workshop. “Madhu Madhu” was the next presenter. This Indian female academic came on stage and started to explain the politics behind her name and how it went wrong. Her name was just “Madhu.” Not “Madhu Madhu.”
In India, you can tell a person’s caste by his/her last name. There is pervasive discrimination based on the caste to which you belong. Since you are born into a caste, there is absolute immobility. This is a barrier to social equality, also in academia.
For these reasons, she was politically motivated to drop her last name.
When she applied to do this workshop in the United Kingdom, she explained her name change multiple times to the organisers. However, columns needed to be filled and this diverged from academic protocol. Hence, the organisers gave her the name “Madhu Madhu.”
One might argue that whilst her politics are relevant and convincing in her local context, academic standardisation exists to avoid exceptionalism. It would be a privilege for Madhu to change bibliographic standards. It would emphasise her social capital against all those who do not have power to enforce their own name politics. A worthwhile case for academic democracy.
Meanwhile, an accomplished American academic Danah Boyd has succeeded in establishing her name in small letters.
To read the rest, click here 

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Opinion Piece: Why Role Models are a scam

Why role models are a scam

Why do we insist on role models for our children? Why do we need fiction to aspire to when reality with its messiness is a better teacher?
Every New Year starts with a media frenzy, offering us a buffet of role models. Reflective celebrities renewing their feminist vows in the post #metoo era. Ordinary heroes braving last year’s tragedies of hurricanes and terrorism. Past icons reviving in the history books. While the role models refresh every year, the idea of them as essential to our personal growth is unwavering.
What do we do when role models disappoint? The year 2017 saw a host of role models fall to the ground due to sexual misconduct allegations. Can Louis C.K make us laugh anymore? Is Charlie Rose still a brilliant anchor and Kevin Spacey still one of our favorite actors? Role models do not have the privilege of redemption. They are frozen as ideal types for us to emulate. When they lose their perfection, they appear no longer useful. We throw the baby out with the bathwater...
click here for the rest of the article.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Honored to be nominated for the Dutch Teacher of the Year Election for 2018


Every year, The Interstedelijk Studenten Overleg (ISO) holds an election for Teacher of the Year in higher education across the Netherlands. ISO is the largest national student organization in the Netherlands and represents over half a million students of universities and universities of applied sciences.

For 2018, I have been nominated by the Rector and the university board to represent my university for this national competition. Am very honored and grateful. Now the waiting game to see if I reach the finalists in April. Crossing fingers here!



Speaker on Prizes for innovation at the Digital Economies workshop in South Africa

South Africa, here I come! Am excited to finally head to the African continent for the first time. Will be speaking on how prizes are being used to spur innovation and strengthen the digital economies in emerging markets. My talk draws from the commissioned report for the UN on innovation in education in developing countries.

Am being hosted by the timely initiative and network established by Richard Heeks and team called the DIODE network (Development Implications of Digital Economies), funded by the UK's Economic and Social Research Council.

Besides this, I will be exploring new sites for my research on privacy in the global South in Cape town. Also, I am looking into how I can further the mission of Catalyst Lab, the organization I founded in 2015 that stimulates new forms of engaging communication between academia and the lay public using social media. I will be exploring a partnership with CREST (Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.

So much to do, such little time! And of course, do some academic tourism on the side...how can I resist the charms of Cape Town and Stellenbosch!




Monday, November 20, 2017

Opinion piece: A case for the ‘boring’ classroom

A case for the ‘boring’ classroom

There is a growing disdain for the traditional classroom, but for a teacher, the blank walls can be a canvas to play with, thinks Payal Arora.

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Opening Talk at the Rotterdam Talent Week

Erasmus University and the City of Rotterdam are organising the 2nd Rotterdam Talent Week from 1 November until 15 November. The grand opening on 6 November shows how Rotterdam is a thriving place to develop student talents. Abdelkader Benali (Moroccan-Dutch writer and journalist) and I will open the forum through talks to inspire students to pursue their own talents.
The week, organised in collaboration with the foundation Bernard Mandeville, is aimed at students, entrepreneurs, relations, employees and people from Rotterdam. The grand opening will take place in De Doelen at Schouwburgplein on 6 November, 16:00-18:00. Entrance is free of charge, and open to everyone.
More information can be found on the Facebook event.

#talent010 #MakeItHappen #erasmusuni #rdamtalentweek #RTW2017 

Thursday, November 2, 2017